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When a president is sworn into office, that person lays their hand on a Bible and swears to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States of America and ends by saying, “So help me God.” Leadership that does not acknowledge the need for God’s help is foolish. Leaders that say they need the help of God but never seek it are liars.

At the end of the day, the sad history of America is that often politics, party preferences, lobbyists, desire for a personal legacy, and carnal agendas define a president more than the Constitution or the Bible. We have painful illustrations of immorality in the White House, secret tapes, under-the-table deals, and unwise decisions among both parties. We need a leader who will support and defend the Constitution amid a rising tide of those who think it’s just a fluid piece of paper that can be changed according to the whim of the times. That was not the vision of the founding fathers. Continue reading

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The Unwanted Gift: Hearing God in the Midst of Your Struggles
by Tom Elliff

“This is a book we prayed we would never have to read; yet, at the same time, it is one that every believer needs to read. The Unwanted Gift is a revelation from the lives of a godly couple facing adversity, crisis and suffering. We have been privileged to know the Elliffs as friends, mentors, prayer partners and heroes in the faith. As we watched them face the struggles mentioned in this book, one thing was consistent and clear: Tom and Jeannie demonstrated at every turn what it means to take God at His Word. They did not ask for this gift, but they have gifted us with the wisdom they gleaned from receiving it and trusting God in the midst of it. Continue reading

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Every boy grows up with a childhood hero. Someone we looked up to, often a sports figure. My baseball hero was Al Kaline of the Detroit Tigers. He played his whole career with the Tigers, and he played right field which I played in Little League. In football, my dad saw to it that I was an Ole Miss fan. The quarterback at Ole Miss was typically my favorite football player. My favorite still is Archie Manning. In basketball, I was a Boston Celtics fan (again, because of my dad), and my favorite was John Havlicek. I have signed pictures of all of these men in my home or office.

Nonetheless, the man I watched more than any other was Arnold Palmer. I remember watching him on our black and white TV repeatedly win the Masters in the 1960s. He was the first superstar of golf and especially golf on television. My dad and I talked about his swing when we would go out and play golf on Sunday afternoons. I took up golf because of my dad and Arnold Palmer. Continue reading